HSUS Assault on Hunting

June 30, 2014 Columnists , News Stories 1390 Views
HSUS Assault on Hunting

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), along with other anti-hunting groups and individuals, filed a petition with the Interior Department demanding rules against hunting with traditional ammunition on public lands – one-fifth of the total land area in the U.S. The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) warned this was coming after the HSUS playbook for banning hunting was discovered. “We are going to use the ballot box and the democratic process to stop all hunting in the United States. We will take it species by species until all hunting is stopped in California. Then we will take it state by state.” (Full Cry Magazine, 1 October 1990).

The 50 page-petition is littered with junk science and fails to make the case that the use of traditional ammunition is a threat to wildlife populations or to humans that would warrant such a drastic action. Are we really to believe HSUS finds hunting acceptable just so long as hunters use alternative ammunition?  Hunters, sportsmen and target shooters aren’t gullible.  We know better than to trust HSUS with setting hunting policy for the entire country. But we can’t assume the Obama Administration’s Interior Department is on our side.

Because of this petition, NSSF is encouraging all hunters and target shooters to call Interior Secretary Sally Jewell at 202-208-3181 and tell her to reject this scientifically baseless petition from HSUS to ban traditional ammunition. We should let the Department of the Interior know that requiring the use of alternative, non-lead ammunition, is nothing more than a back-door way to ban hunting by raising the price of participating in an American sporting tradition. Make sure to let them know: There is no sound science to support banning traditional ammunition used by hunters for centuries; Don’t allow the Humane Society and other anti-hunting groups to advance their end game of banning all hunting through the tactic of by banning the use of traditional ammunition for hunting on public lands; There is absolutely no adverse wildlife population impact that warrants such a drastic measure; There is no evidence that consuming game taken with traditional ammunition poses a human health to hunters and their family; Hunters are the original conservationists.  Excise taxes (11%) raised from the sale of traditional ammunition is a primary source of wildlife conservation funding. Banning traditional ammunition will harm the very animals HSUS claims to care about.

It’s hard to believe but the July 4th weekend is just around the corner. This year the Fourth falls on a Friday, making it a long weekend for most folks. A lot of folks will be spending time outdoors, and it is a great chance to introduce someone to fishing. On July 4, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission invites anglers and would-be anglers of all ages to go fishing — for free. From 12:01 a.m. until 11:59 p.m., everyone in North Carolina — resident and non-residents alike — can fish in any public body of water, including coastal waters, without purchasing a fishing license or additional trout fishing privilege.

Although no fishing license is required, all other fishing regulations, such as size and creel limits and lure restrictions, still apply. To give anglers a better chance of catching fish, the Commission stocks a variety of fish in waters across the state — including trout and channel catfish. The agency also provides access to fishing sites across the state, including public fishing areas and boating access areas. The interactive fishing and boating maps on the Commission’s website list more than 500 fishing and boating areas, many of which are free, that are open to the public.

Authorized by the N.C. General Assembly and started in 1994, North Carolina’s annual free fishing day always falls on July 4. On all other days of the year, a fishing license is not required for anglers 15 years and younger, but anyone age 16 and older must have a fishing license to fish in any public water in North Carolina, including coastal waters.

Share this story
Email

About author

Related articles