Asheville resumes traffic calming projects

June 9, 2014 Asheville , News Stories 1036 Views
Asheville resumes traffic calming projects

city_of_asheville-300x182[1]

Special to the Tribune-

Following a revision to the City’s traffic calming policy and approval by Asheville City Council, the City of Asheville Transportation Department has resumed projects designed to ease traffic speed on neighborhood roads.

Speeding and unnecessary through-traffic presents dangers that affect the quality of life in residential areas. In order to provide a safer environment, the City of Asheville seeks to provide traffic calming to neighborhoods that go through the process of requesting it.

A 2000 Traffic Calming Policy approved by City Council established a protocol for responding to requests from residents for traffic calming installations, but funding for such projects has been unavailable since 2007. With $100,000 funding approved in the 2013/2014 budget, the Transportation Department is able to once more address requests on hold since 2007.

“We have a backlog of traffic calming projects requested by residents that stretches back seven years or so, and those are going to be our first priority right now,” said Transportation Director Ken Putnam. “We appreciate the patience of these folks and are working closely with them to move projects forward.”

The department worked closely with the Public Safety Committee, the Neighborhood Advisory Committee, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Task Force sub-committee and the Asheville Police Department to develop next steps.

The new action plan and policy revisions shift focus to the use of speed humps, speed cushions or other lower-cost strategies. That move will stretch the funding budgeted for traffic calming by focusing on installation instead of design.

“Speed humps are really the most economical kind of device to slow traffic, and they are easier on vehicles,” Putnam said. “Bicyclists also seem to prefer them to other speed reduction devices.”

Staff is currently analyzing the top seven locations on the waiting list to determine those that meet the criteria for traffic calming, including a certain threshold of traffic volume and an identified speeding problem.

“We work closely with the neighborhoods on these,” Putnam says. “Especially since there is the possibility that interest in traffic calming may have declined over time.”

Updates on individual traffic calming projects will be posted to the City’s Projects Page at ashevillenc.gov/projects.

The entire list of locations that are under consideration or being evaluated for traffic calming can be found at http://ow.ly/xpkyq.

This article can be found online at coablog.ashevillenc.gov.

Share this story
Email

About author

Related articles