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Local Republican leader: Government should not replace God, families

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By Leslee Kulba-Why would anybody in their right mind want to join the Buncombe County Republican Women’s Club? Republicans are conservatives, a dying breed bitterly clinging, as even the president stated, to their guns and religion. They support the notion that people create government, and therefore must control it. Worst of all, they oppress and subjugate women by denying them the most fundamental of human rights, that of tax-subsidized abortion. How uncool.

Laura Bowen, president of the BCRWC, recognizes that Republicans have an image problem, but denies that the party is no longer relevant. For all intents and purposes, America’s remains a two-party system. Bowen said she was very motivated by a comment she heard back when she was living in Arizona to the effect that elections are not won on Election Day, but it was imperative that people declare their party well in advance.

Today, the country has a president making unilateral decisions beyond the scope of powers Constitutionally allotted him, and the average citizen feels helpless. Bowen said the situation would be different if a critical mass of representatives who would honor the principles of the Republican party could be elected. One of the major aims of the BCRWC is to get conservative women elected to office. In addition to professing conservative values, Bowen adds qualified candidates must have courage. They must be able to endure criticism and withstand pressure. The BCRWC, therefore, is seeking to elect more than RINO’s (Republicans in Name Only).

A shortcoming Bowen sees with “representatives” running the current de-facto welfare state is a lot of oblivion. She told how a couple of her sons living in the Beltway were scorned for (1) driving pickups with (2) North Carolina plates. She told of socialites who let their kids rot. Currently working as a substitute teacher in public schools, she sees children of working families dressed as ragamuffins while the “poor” wear $300 tennis shoes. Bowen knows government does not create wealth. It only redistributes it at a loss, creating unfair and often unwise advantages.

Bowen agrees with county GOP chair Henry Mitchell’s efforts to streamline the party’s principles. Too much is going awry with the country to be splitting hairs over incidentals. The Buncombe County GOP has informally adopted a few rallying points on which it will focus in the near term. These are merely the fundamental notions underlying the creation of this country. In sum, they express support for the US Constitution as a limit on centralized control over the sovereign and self-determining individual.

Bowen thinks it’s a shame the way people discredit and disrespect the intentional, careful thought and consideration the Founding Fathers put into establishing a system of government that would bless the lives of its citizens – what Benjamin Franklin described as, “a Republic, if you can keep it.” How to engage more Republican-leaning individuals in the process is problematic. The normal Republican might work one or two jobs, go to school, and spend what time is left taking the kids to soccer practice or piano lessons. They don’t have time to run for office, or even write a letter thanking their Congressman for a wise vote.

Contrast this to the Democrats. Bowen said during early voting, the Democrats had a table set up at each site, and they were passing out colorful pamphlets that several voters appeared to be using as cheat sheets. The Democrats are organized, but they’re tearing apart the fiber that holds society together.

Bowen says there are certain things people agree to do to live in civil harmony. Some of these are based on the idea that it’s better to build a guardrail than to keep an ambulance in the valley. In the name of liberation, the old immorality has become the new immorality; but the consequences, such as greater demands on the rest of society to fund more emergency, criminal justice, and social services remain. Bowen says people make a big deal about a woman’s right to do what she wants with her body, but seldom do political discussions deal with the trauma of the guilt a woman endures, when, in a quiet moment, she wonders what depriving her baby of life’s experience means in the eternal scheme of things. On the subject of a lost sense of social responsibility, Bowen repeated a prevalent perception, “There aren’t consequences if government supports it.”

Today, countless children are born out of wedlock, and legislators are more than happy to keep the masses happy by telling traditional breadwinners, “Move over, little dog, ‘cuz the big dog’s movin’ in.” As people become more dependent on the federal government for food and shelter, self-worth diminishes. Bowen thinks rebuilding strong family relationships is essential to strengthening the country. A mother of six, Bowen says she does not in the least regret the fifteen years she got to be a stay-at-home mom.

Traditional families instilled values and provided stability that government doesn’t. “I think it’s sad men don’t see their children as a heritage and want to be involved in that child’s life.” Bowen would love to return to a world of traditional families, but is very sympathetic toward those who fall short of the fairy-tale ideal. Getting choked up, Bowen recounts attending her daughter’s graduation from boot camp. She said there were numerous grandmothers in the audience who were caring for children while their moms joined the military so they could have a sense of supporting their children, rather than taking a thanks-for-nothing handout.

Bowen knows a political solution is not the cure. To make everybody uphold conservative values would defeat the purpose. People have to want to live providently, intentionally, and kindly. “Of course the best thing is if people would just turn to God,” said Bowen. “That would do a lot.” People need to go to church with a mind to reflecting and renewing themselves spiritually.

Men or women interested in finding ways to make government more responsive to the needs of those who are playing by the rules and trying to do things right is welcome to attend the BRWC’s planning meeting to be held at the Cornerstone Restaurant on Tunnel Road, Tuesday, January 9, beginning at 11:00 a.m.

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